/tagged/In+America%21/page/2

"How I Stopped Hating Thanksgiving and Learned to Be Afraid"

takealookaroundus:

Although it’s well known to anyone who wants to know, let me summarize the argument against Thanksgiving: European invaders exterminated nearly the entire indigenous population to create the United States. Without that holocaust, the United States as we know it would not exist. The United States celebrates a Thanksgiving Day holiday dominated not by atonement for that horrendous crime against humanity but by a falsified account of the “encounter” between Europeans and American Indians. When confronted with this, most people in the United States (outside of indigenous communities) ignore the history or attack those who make the argument. This is intellectually dishonest, politically irresponsible, and morally bankrupt.

In left/radical circles, even though that basic critique is widely accepted, a relatively small number of people argue that we should renounce the holiday and refuse to celebrate it in any fashion. Most leftists who celebrate Thanksgiving claim that they can individually redefine the holiday in a politically progressive fashion in private, which is an illusory dodge: We don’t define holidays individually or privately — the idea of a holiday is rooted in its collective, shared meaning. When the dominant culture defines a holiday in a certain fashion, one can’t pretend to redefine it in private. To pretend we can do that also is intellectually dishonest, politically irresponsible, and morally bankrupt.”

(Source: commondreams.org, via glamaphonic)

In 1970, the Massachusetts Department of Commerce asked the Wampanoags to select a speaker to mark the 350th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ landing.  Frank James “was selected, but first he had to show a copy of his speech to the white people in charge of the ceremony.  When they saw what he had written, they would not allow him to read it.” James had written:

Today is a time of celebrating for you … but it is not a time of celebrating for me. It is with heavy heart that I look back upon what happened to my People … The Pilgrims had hardly explored the shores of Cape Cod four days before they had robbed the graves of my ancestors, and stolen their corn, wheat, and beans. … Massasoit, the great leader of the Wampanoag, knew these facts; yet he and his People welcomed and befriended the settlers … little knowing that … before 50 years were to pass, the Wampanoags … and other Indians living near the settlers would be killed by their guns or dead from diseases that we caught from them. … Although our way of life is almost gone and our language is almost extinct, we the Wampanoags still walk the lands of Massachusetts. … What has happened cannot be changed, but today we work toward a better America, a more Indian America where people and nature once again are important.

What the Massachusetts Department of Commerce censored was not some incediary falsehood but historical truth. Nothing James would have said, had he been allowed to speak, was false, excepting the word wheat. Most of our textbooks also omit the facts about grave robbing, Indian enslavement, and so on, even though they were common knowledge in colonial New England. Thus our popular history of the Pilgrims has not been a process of gaining perspective but of deliberate forgetting.

Lies My Teacher Told Me by James W. Loewen

Considering that virtually none of the standard fare surrounding Thanksgiving contains an ounce of authenticity, historical accuracy, or cross-cultural perception, why is it so apparently ingrained? It is necessary to the American psyche to perpetually exploit and debase its victims in order to justify its history?
– Michael Dorris, quoted in Lies My Teacher Told Me by James W. Loewen

Rand expresses, with a certain pithy crudeness, an instinct that courses through us all sometimes: I’m the only one who matters! I’m not going to care about any of you any more! She then absolutizes it in an amphetamine Benzedrine-charged reductio ad absurdum by insisting it is the only feeling worth entertaining, ever.

This urge exists everywhere, but why is it supercharged on the American right, where Rand is regarded as something more than a bad, bizarre joke? In a country where almost everyone believes—wrongly, on the whole—that they are self-made, perhaps it is easier to have contempt for people who didn’t make much of themselves. And Rand taps into something deeper still. The founding myth of America is that the nation was built out of nothing, using only reason and willpower. Rand applies this myth to the individual American: You made yourself. You need nobody and nothing except your reason to rise and dominate. You can be America, in one body, in one mind.

She said the United States should be a “democracy of superiors only,” with superiority defined by being rich. Well, we got it. As the health care crisis has shown, today, the rich have the real power: The vote that matters is expressed with a checkbook and a lobbyist. We get to vote only for the candidates they have pre-funded and receive the legislation they have preapproved. It’s useful—if daunting—to know that there is a substantial slice of the American public who believe this is not a problem to be put right, but morally admirable.

This Slate article hits the nail on the head about why Ayn Rand’s philosophy is so despicable and yet so seductive to many Americans

(bolding mine)

awyeahmona:

[trauma warnings for police brutality]

pantslessprogressive:

Occupy Wall Street News Roundup, Sept. 24-25

Police Brutality:

Police pen up and mace female protesters [Raw Story]

Young man arrested simply for walking down the street [laurasthinkingwithportals]

Protester thrown over barricade by police [evanfleischer]

Protester shouts, “Is this what you’re about?”, gets cuffed [@LibertyPlazaRev]

Officer pushes sitting protester, man stands up, cops arrest him [@LilKing420s]

Cops Tackle, Mace Wall St. Protesters for No Obvious Reason [Gawker]

In the News: 

Occupy Wall Street makes the Sunday cover of NY Daily News [@DhaniBagels]

NYPD Silent On Pepper Spraying Of Downtown Protesters [NY1]

Wall Street protesters cuffed, pepper-sprayed during ‘inequality’ march [NY Daily News]

80 Arrested as Financial District Protest Moves North [NY Times]

Gunning for Wall Street, With Faulty Aim [NY Times]

Arrests at New York anti-Wall Street protest [Al Jazeera]

Protesters march in Manhattan, criticizing Wall Street [Reuters]

Police crack down on ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protests [Guardian]

80 arrested as ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest of bank bailouts, mortgage crisis marches in NYC [Washington Post/AP]

Protesters march in Manhattan, criticizing Wall Street, getting arrested [MSNBC]

Dozens arrested in 8th day of ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protests [CNN]

Police Arrest 80 During ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protest [Fox News]

80 ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protesters Arrested [WSJ]

‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protests Turn Violent; Video Shows Police Macing Women [ABC]

Wall St protests: Police harsh, media silent? [RT]

Occupy Wall Street Calm So Far in Ninth Day [Village Voice]

Why ‘Occupy Wall Street’ makes sense [Amy Goodman]

Occupy Wall Street rediscovers the radical imagination [David Graeber]

Occupy Wall Street’s Leaderless Democracy [The Indypendent]

11 Things You Can Do to Help the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Movement [Alternet]

Must Watch: 9/11 first responder occupies Wall Street [evanfleischer]

Check out Occupy Together, a new site listing occupation movements across the country.

Email NY-based journalists and urge them to cover the protest [inothernews]

Watch the Global Revolution livestream.

Follow Evan Fleischer for a steady stream of news from the Occupy Wall Street movement.

[Photo: Alex Fradkin]

(Source: pantslessprogressive)

roxanneritchi:seawitchery | polerin | tariqk | cognitivedissonance:

Police pen up and mace female “Occupy Wall Street” protesters

In a disturbing scene from today’s “Occupy Wall Street” protests, a group of peaceful female protesters were rounded up in an orange-colored mesh pen by police and subsequently sprayed with mace without any provocation.

In spite of multiple reported incidents of possible police violence, major media outlets seem to be content to let the protests go by completely unreported, following the same “who-cares” attitude they have taken toward recent revelations that the NYPD has violated the Constitutional rights of American citizens by spying on them as possible terrorists and enemies of the state despite a complete absence of evidence of any crimes.

This is absolutely disturbing. Penning people up to mace them is police brutality. Period. What will it take to get the mainstream media to pay attention? If you follow the #OccupyWallStreet, you’ll find out that at least 80 were arrested today. AP and Wall Street Journal mentioned the arrests briefly today. 

What happened to telling others to uphold the principles of justice and freedom, Americans? Too much for you to do?

Bold for troof.

holy shit. i knew it was going to happen here.

(via formerlyroxy)

Many of you may not understand what’s going on with OccupyWallStreet…

roxanneritchi:rosalarian | duessa | wherbear:

To put it rather simply, our government is bought, it’s no longer Washington in control but the corporations and the rich. There is even a law that states corporations are PEOPLE and have the right to donate to whatever political cause. The main stream media is also bought and controlled. We continue to give TRILLIONS in tax cuts for the top 1 percent. We continue to spend TRILLIONS on wars, wars that no one can specify what would count as “winning.” Wars where our men and women in uniform are dying. Spending our money rebuilding a country we invaded and bombed in the first place. We continue to give SUBSIDIES to OIL COMPANIES when they are the richest companies in the world. We continue to let the men who got us into this financial mess go unpunished. While unemployment continues to rise. While they have talks debating whether SOCIAL SECURITY and MEDICARE should be cut. While funding for education, law enforcement, regulations, environment safety, food safety, and more programs helping the middle class get CUT. While costs for going to college continue to RISE only for those graduates to graduate and have no job to be hired for and no way to pay back those 100,000+ in loans. Back in 2008 with the initial financial collapse Americans voiced a resounding NO to bailing out wall street and the banks. During the first congressional vote the bill to bail out the banks did not pass, however one of the CEOs cut a back room deal forcing tax payers to bail them out anyway.

You never hear about any of this on the main stream media because they are also bought and controlled.

We elected Obama President in 2008 and instead of the change he promised we’ve only continued to get the same. He has also receiving millions in donations from Wall Street, and whenever he attempts to fight back, he always backs down and gives in.

The people are getting tired of this, and one example are the protests on Wall Street, today over 50 people have been arrested for no reason whatsoever. Many brutally so. 

This is a big deal, this is supposed to be the United States of America. Things like this shouldn’t be happening in the first place but it is. We are moving backwards as a country and not forward.

For those feeling out of the loop.

I’ve been wanting to comment on this situation for a while, but I can’t without getting angry, so here, have somebody else talking about it.

Essentially, peaceful protests on Wall Street end with police brutality and the media conveniently has “better” things to report on than this.

I’m feeling incredibly powerless while reading about this. It frustrates me beyond comprehension until my brain shuts off.

(via formerlyroxy)

Over the next two centuries [after 1540], wars of outright extermination had been fought by British colonists against “the Indians of Virginia” and nations such as the Pequot (who were among those who had fed the Plymouth Colony on the first “Thanksgiving” in 1620). […]

By the mid-19th century, U.S. policymakers and military commanders were stating — openly, frequently, and in plain English — that their objective was no less than the “complete extermination” of any native people who resisted being dispossessed of their lands, subordinated to federal authority, and assimilated into the colonizing culture. The country was as good as its word on the matter, perpetrating literally hundreds of massacres of Indians by military and paramilitary formations at points all over the West. A bare sampling of some of the worst must include the 1854 massacre of perhaps 150 Lakotas at Blue River (Nebraska), the 1863 Bear River (Idaho) Massacre of some 500 Western Shoshones, the 1864 Sand Creek (Colorado) Massacre of as many as 250 Cheyennes and Arapahoes, the 1868 massacre of another 300 Cheyennes at the Washita River (Oklahoma), the 1875 massacre of about seventy-five Cheyennes along the Sappa Creek (Kansas), the 1878 massacre of still another 100 Cheyennes at Camp Robinson (Nebraska), and the 1890 massacre of more than 300 Lakotas at Wounded Knee (South Dakota). As the U.S. Bureau of the Census put it in 1894:

"It has been estimated that since 1775, more than [8,500 Indians] have been killed in individual affairs with [whites]… The Indian wars under the government of the United States have been more than 40 in number. They have cost the lives of… about 30,000 Indians… The actual number of killed and wounded Indians must be very much greater than the number given, as they conceal, where possible, their actual loss in battle… Fifty percent additional would be a safe number to add to the numbers given."

This comes to a minimum of 56,750 Indians killed outright by Euroamericans militarily pushing into native lands during a period roughly conforming to the century spanning the years 1775-1875. Thornton, who has examined the matter closely, suggests that the official number is far too low and might “easily” be doubled.

Demography of Native North America by Lenore A. Stiffarm

During 1763, while striving to defeat Pontiac’s confederation of Ottowas and other peoples:

Sir Jeffrey Amherst, commander-in-chief of the British forces, wrote in a postscript of a letter to Bouquet [a subordinate] that smallpox be sent among the disaffected tribes. Bouquet replied, also in a postscript, “I will try to [contaminate] them with some blankets that may fall into their hands, and take care not to get the disease myself” … To Bouquet’s postscript Amherst replied, “You will do well to [infect] the Indians by means to blankets as well as to try every other method that can serve to extirpate this exorable race.” On June 24, Captain Ecuyer, of the Royal Americans, noted in his journal: “…we gave them two blankets and a handkerchief out of the smallpox hospital. I hope it will have the desired effect.”

It did. The disease spread rapidly among the Mingo, Delaware, Shawnee, and other nations of the Ohio River Valley, killing perhaps 100,000 people and bringing about the collapse of Pontiac’s military alliance.

Demography of Native North America by Lenore A. Stiffarm, with the middle paragraph quoted from The Effects of Smallpox on the Destiny of the Amerindian by E. Wagner Stearn and Allen E. Stearn

extirpate = to root out and destroy completely

The issue goes to the concept of the “Norman Yoke,” an element of juridical philosophy arising among medieval Anglo-Saxons and subsequently incorporated into the British variants of the Doctrine of Discovery and Rights of Conquest. In simplest terms, the concept, as it was eventually articulated in John Locke’s philosophy of Natural Law, held that any “Christian” (read: European) happening upon “waste land” — most particularly land that was vacant or virtually vacant of human inhabitants — assumed not only a “natural right,” but indeed an obligation to put such land to “productive use.” Having thus performed “God’s will” by “cultivating” and thereby “conquering” the former “wilderness,” its “discoverer” can be said to “own” it. It was upon this peculiar doctrine that Chief Justice of the Supreme Court John Marshall, in his 1823 opinion in the Johnson v. McIntosh case, based the notion that the U.S. holds “inherent and preeminent rights” over Indian lands.

For Marshall’s utilization of the idea of the Norman Yoke to work out for the United States, it was/is necessary to believe that there were very few native people prior to the onset of the European invasion of North America. A substantial precontact native population would imply that the land was for all intents and purposes not vacant. […]

For Eurosupremecists, either historical or contemporary, to admit that the precontact Native North American population had been fifteen million rather than one or two million would compel their admission of a number of other uncomfortable facts. For instance, the larger population figure could only have been sustained by a primary reliance upon extensive agriculture rather than hunting and gathering. This, in turn, means that precontact American Indians were primarily “sedentary” rather than “nomadic,” cultivators of the land, and residents of permanent towns rather than wandering occupants of a “barren wilderness.”

Demography of Native North America by Lenore A. Stiffarm

Regarding the two numbers s/he throws out: They’re both estimates of the pre-European-contact native population of the continental United States.  1-2 million is an old estimate that was derived through pretty shoddy estimation methods and was biased by the wish to downplay the size of the native population and shore up the myth of “No really you guys, the continent was practically empty so it’s totes okay that we stole it!”  15 million is a more recent and much more accurate estimate.

Imagine you live in a nation where the government owns your property. It has a powerful agency called the Bureau of Caucasian Affairs to control wards of the state, including you. The agency supervises your family and decides what is best. It handles your money, enforces morals, personal appearance, and manner of dress. It provides state-approved religion, schooling, and food for your community. This is all done by the superintendent — a government bureaucrat placed in charge of your community with complete control over it. No one can leave without his permission. Like a god, he makes the laws and acts as the police, prosecutor, judge, and jury. The courts cannot review his actions, for they are all, by definition perfectly legal.

Sound like totalitarianism? Nope, it is the abuse of guardianship. For several generations, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) used its trustee powers to become an intolerant and all-powerful ruler of Indian people, and the courts allowed this anomaly to happen.

In the Courts of the Conqueror by Walter Echo-Hawk
American history was for a long time written and taught as a single story, a narrative of nation building and unending progress that united the diverse participants in the country’s past in a single American “experience.” It was a national success story, celebrating the human triumphs made possible in a society based on the principles of liberty and equality. American historians tended to ignore or dismiss people whose experiences and interpretations of the past did not conform to the master narrative. The experiences of American Indians during the years of nation building told a story of decline and suffering rather than of “progress” and “the pursuit of happiness.” As a result, notes historian Frederick E. Hoxie, the authors of United States history textbooks had “great difficulty shaping the Native American experience to fit the upbeat format of their books.” The Indians’ story was not the American story; best to leave them out.

First Peoples: A Documentary Survey of American Indian History by Colin G. Calloway

I had to laugh at the second-to-last sentence because wow, trying to make a centuries-long genocide seem “upbeat?”  Yeah, I imagine that’d be pretty difficult to pull off.  *headdesk*

Lololololol um, this is closer to the truth than I’d like to admit.

So let me say this as clearly as I can — the United States is not and will never be at war with Islam.
– President Obama (via nowaitninjas)

(Source: hahahanooope, via mistyknights)

A friend of mine has an American boyfriend, who once said that he always had figured that the odds that his girlfriend wouldn’t have sex with him (or have huge hangups about it) would be around 50-50, and I never really understood why. I think I unconsciously imagine American culture as “just like ours except everyone speaks English” (I’m Swedish), probably because American media is everywhere here and thus kind of feels like “home” even though it’s not. I know the gender roles are a bit different but that didn’t seem to be the whole explanation. I thought there must be something else going on, but I couldn’t figure it out.

Then, I started reading http://www.fugitivus.net/ and Tiger Beatdown, and I learned just how hard it can be for Americans to get birth control, plan B or an abortion, even though they’re legal. Here, there are youth clinics that seem pretty similar to PP, except they are not controversial at all. You will probably visit one as part of sex ed around 8th grade. Abortions are free up to a certain age (18 or 20 or something) but even when they’re not, they won’t cost more than 300 SEK (around $45). Minors don’t have to notify their parents. Birth control is subsidized and you can get free condoms from the youth clinics. Some people dislike abortions, but they have no political influence, and absolutely no one thinks the plan B pill is immoral.

Several of my friends have needed plan B, some of them while minors, and they just went to the nearest youth clinic and asked for it. No charge, no hassle, no protestors, no conscience clauses, no having to travel hours and hours just to find a clinic. Just swallow the pill, withstand some friendly teasing and get on with your life.

I think this difference between American and Northern/Western European women’s lives is absolutely fundamental, and to me it completely explains why my friend’s American boyfriend expected that girls wouldn’t sleep with him – not because they wouldn’t want to or because American women are more sensitive to pressure from gender roles, but because they would be taking a huge personal risk. I totally get why a lot of people wouldn’t be up for that. (It also explains why some Americans want to use condoms and the pill at the same time – before understanding your lack of abortion access that seemed pretty paranoid to me, but now I get it!)

I try to imagine not having access to affordable birth control or abortions, and it’s a horror movie level of scary. Just imagining that someone could impregnate me against my will and not being able to do anything about it… holy shit.

– AK, a Swede, commenting on the reproductive rights situation in America, on the Tiger Beatdown post

"How I Stopped Hating Thanksgiving and Learned to Be Afraid"

takealookaroundus:

Although it’s well known to anyone who wants to know, let me summarize the argument against Thanksgiving: European invaders exterminated nearly the entire indigenous population to create the United States. Without that holocaust, the United States as we know it would not exist. The United States celebrates a Thanksgiving Day holiday dominated not by atonement for that horrendous crime against humanity but by a falsified account of the “encounter” between Europeans and American Indians. When confronted with this, most people in the United States (outside of indigenous communities) ignore the history or attack those who make the argument. This is intellectually dishonest, politically irresponsible, and morally bankrupt.

In left/radical circles, even though that basic critique is widely accepted, a relatively small number of people argue that we should renounce the holiday and refuse to celebrate it in any fashion. Most leftists who celebrate Thanksgiving claim that they can individually redefine the holiday in a politically progressive fashion in private, which is an illusory dodge: We don’t define holidays individually or privately — the idea of a holiday is rooted in its collective, shared meaning. When the dominant culture defines a holiday in a certain fashion, one can’t pretend to redefine it in private. To pretend we can do that also is intellectually dishonest, politically irresponsible, and morally bankrupt.”

(Source: commondreams.org, via glamaphonic)

In 1970, the Massachusetts Department of Commerce asked the Wampanoags to select a speaker to mark the 350th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ landing.  Frank James “was selected, but first he had to show a copy of his speech to the white people in charge of the ceremony.  When they saw what he had written, they would not allow him to read it.” James had written:

Today is a time of celebrating for you … but it is not a time of celebrating for me. It is with heavy heart that I look back upon what happened to my People … The Pilgrims had hardly explored the shores of Cape Cod four days before they had robbed the graves of my ancestors, and stolen their corn, wheat, and beans. … Massasoit, the great leader of the Wampanoag, knew these facts; yet he and his People welcomed and befriended the settlers … little knowing that … before 50 years were to pass, the Wampanoags … and other Indians living near the settlers would be killed by their guns or dead from diseases that we caught from them. … Although our way of life is almost gone and our language is almost extinct, we the Wampanoags still walk the lands of Massachusetts. … What has happened cannot be changed, but today we work toward a better America, a more Indian America where people and nature once again are important.

What the Massachusetts Department of Commerce censored was not some incediary falsehood but historical truth. Nothing James would have said, had he been allowed to speak, was false, excepting the word wheat. Most of our textbooks also omit the facts about grave robbing, Indian enslavement, and so on, even though they were common knowledge in colonial New England. Thus our popular history of the Pilgrims has not been a process of gaining perspective but of deliberate forgetting.

Lies My Teacher Told Me by James W. Loewen

Considering that virtually none of the standard fare surrounding Thanksgiving contains an ounce of authenticity, historical accuracy, or cross-cultural perception, why is it so apparently ingrained? It is necessary to the American psyche to perpetually exploit and debase its victims in order to justify its history?
– Michael Dorris, quoted in Lies My Teacher Told Me by James W. Loewen

Rand expresses, with a certain pithy crudeness, an instinct that courses through us all sometimes: I’m the only one who matters! I’m not going to care about any of you any more! She then absolutizes it in an amphetamine Benzedrine-charged reductio ad absurdum by insisting it is the only feeling worth entertaining, ever.

This urge exists everywhere, but why is it supercharged on the American right, where Rand is regarded as something more than a bad, bizarre joke? In a country where almost everyone believes—wrongly, on the whole—that they are self-made, perhaps it is easier to have contempt for people who didn’t make much of themselves. And Rand taps into something deeper still. The founding myth of America is that the nation was built out of nothing, using only reason and willpower. Rand applies this myth to the individual American: You made yourself. You need nobody and nothing except your reason to rise and dominate. You can be America, in one body, in one mind.

She said the United States should be a “democracy of superiors only,” with superiority defined by being rich. Well, we got it. As the health care crisis has shown, today, the rich have the real power: The vote that matters is expressed with a checkbook and a lobbyist. We get to vote only for the candidates they have pre-funded and receive the legislation they have preapproved. It’s useful—if daunting—to know that there is a substantial slice of the American public who believe this is not a problem to be put right, but morally admirable.

This Slate article hits the nail on the head about why Ayn Rand’s philosophy is so despicable and yet so seductive to many Americans

(bolding mine)

awyeahmona:

[trauma warnings for police brutality]
pantslessprogressive:

Occupy Wall Street News Roundup, Sept. 24-25
Police Brutality:
Police pen up and mace female protesters [Raw Story]
Young man arrested simply for walking down the street [laurasthinkingwithportals]
Protester thrown over barricade by police [evanfleischer]
Protester shouts, “Is this what you’re about?”, gets cuffed [@LibertyPlazaRev]
Officer pushes sitting protester, man stands up, cops arrest him [@LilKing420s]
Cops Tackle, Mace Wall St. Protesters for No Obvious Reason [Gawker]
In the News: 
Occupy Wall Street makes the Sunday cover of NY Daily News [@DhaniBagels]
NYPD Silent On Pepper Spraying Of Downtown Protesters [NY1]
Wall Street protesters cuffed, pepper-sprayed during ‘inequality’ march [NY Daily News]
80 Arrested as Financial District Protest Moves North [NY Times]
Gunning for Wall Street, With Faulty Aim [NY Times]
Arrests at New York anti-Wall Street protest [Al Jazeera]
Protesters march in Manhattan, criticizing Wall Street [Reuters]
Police crack down on ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protests [Guardian]
80 arrested as ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest of bank bailouts, mortgage crisis marches in NYC [Washington Post/AP]
Protesters march in Manhattan, criticizing Wall Street, getting arrested [MSNBC]
Dozens arrested in 8th day of ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protests [CNN]
Police Arrest 80 During ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protest [Fox News]
80 ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protesters Arrested [WSJ]
‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protests Turn Violent; Video Shows Police Macing Women [ABC]
Wall St protests: Police harsh, media silent? [RT]
Occupy Wall Street Calm So Far in Ninth Day [Village Voice]
Why ‘Occupy Wall Street’ makes sense [Amy Goodman]
Occupy Wall Street rediscovers the radical imagination [David Graeber]
Occupy Wall Street’s Leaderless Democracy [The Indypendent]
11 Things You Can Do to Help the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Movement [Alternet]
Must Watch: 9/11 first responder occupies Wall Street [evanfleischer]
Check out Occupy Together, a new site listing occupation movements across the country.
Email NY-based journalists and urge them to cover the protest [inothernews]
Watch the Global Revolution livestream.
Follow Evan Fleischer for a steady stream of news from the Occupy Wall Street movement.
[Photo: Alex Fradkin]

awyeahmona:

[trauma warnings for police brutality]

pantslessprogressive:

Occupy Wall Street News Roundup, Sept. 24-25

Police Brutality:

Police pen up and mace female protesters [Raw Story]

Young man arrested simply for walking down the street [laurasthinkingwithportals]

Protester thrown over barricade by police [evanfleischer]

Protester shouts, “Is this what you’re about?”, gets cuffed [@LibertyPlazaRev]

Officer pushes sitting protester, man stands up, cops arrest him [@LilKing420s]

Cops Tackle, Mace Wall St. Protesters for No Obvious Reason [Gawker]

In the News: 

Occupy Wall Street makes the Sunday cover of NY Daily News [@DhaniBagels]

NYPD Silent On Pepper Spraying Of Downtown Protesters [NY1]

Wall Street protesters cuffed, pepper-sprayed during ‘inequality’ march [NY Daily News]

80 Arrested as Financial District Protest Moves North [NY Times]

Gunning for Wall Street, With Faulty Aim [NY Times]

Arrests at New York anti-Wall Street protest [Al Jazeera]

Protesters march in Manhattan, criticizing Wall Street [Reuters]

Police crack down on ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protests [Guardian]

80 arrested as ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest of bank bailouts, mortgage crisis marches in NYC [Washington Post/AP]

Protesters march in Manhattan, criticizing Wall Street, getting arrested [MSNBC]

Dozens arrested in 8th day of ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protests [CNN]

Police Arrest 80 During ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protest [Fox News]

80 ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protesters Arrested [WSJ]

‘Occupy Wall Street’ Protests Turn Violent; Video Shows Police Macing Women [ABC]

Wall St protests: Police harsh, media silent? [RT]

Occupy Wall Street Calm So Far in Ninth Day [Village Voice]

Why ‘Occupy Wall Street’ makes sense [Amy Goodman]

Occupy Wall Street rediscovers the radical imagination [David Graeber]

Occupy Wall Street’s Leaderless Democracy [The Indypendent]

11 Things You Can Do to Help the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ Movement [Alternet]

Must Watch: 9/11 first responder occupies Wall Street [evanfleischer]

Check out Occupy Together, a new site listing occupation movements across the country.

Email NY-based journalists and urge them to cover the protest [inothernews]

Watch the Global Revolution livestream.

Follow Evan Fleischer for a steady stream of news from the Occupy Wall Street movement.

[Photo: Alex Fradkin]

(Source: pantslessprogressive)

roxanneritchi:seawitchery | polerin | tariqk | cognitivedissonance:

Police pen up and mace female “Occupy Wall Street” protesters

In a disturbing scene from today’s “Occupy Wall Street” protests, a group of peaceful female protesters were rounded up in an orange-colored mesh pen by police and subsequently sprayed with mace without any provocation.

In spite of multiple reported incidents of possible police violence, major media outlets seem to be content to let the protests go by completely unreported, following the same “who-cares” attitude they have taken toward recent revelations that the NYPD has violated the Constitutional rights of American citizens by spying on them as possible terrorists and enemies of the state despite a complete absence of evidence of any crimes.

This is absolutely disturbing. Penning people up to mace them is police brutality. Period. What will it take to get the mainstream media to pay attention? If you follow the #OccupyWallStreet, you’ll find out that at least 80 were arrested today. AP and Wall Street Journal mentioned the arrests briefly today. 

What happened to telling others to uphold the principles of justice and freedom, Americans? Too much for you to do?

Bold for troof.

holy shit. i knew it was going to happen here.

(via formerlyroxy)

Many of you may not understand what’s going on with OccupyWallStreet…

roxanneritchi:rosalarian | duessa | wherbear:

To put it rather simply, our government is bought, it’s no longer Washington in control but the corporations and the rich. There is even a law that states corporations are PEOPLE and have the right to donate to whatever political cause. The main stream media is also bought and controlled. We continue to give TRILLIONS in tax cuts for the top 1 percent. We continue to spend TRILLIONS on wars, wars that no one can specify what would count as “winning.” Wars where our men and women in uniform are dying. Spending our money rebuilding a country we invaded and bombed in the first place. We continue to give SUBSIDIES to OIL COMPANIES when they are the richest companies in the world. We continue to let the men who got us into this financial mess go unpunished. While unemployment continues to rise. While they have talks debating whether SOCIAL SECURITY and MEDICARE should be cut. While funding for education, law enforcement, regulations, environment safety, food safety, and more programs helping the middle class get CUT. While costs for going to college continue to RISE only for those graduates to graduate and have no job to be hired for and no way to pay back those 100,000+ in loans. Back in 2008 with the initial financial collapse Americans voiced a resounding NO to bailing out wall street and the banks. During the first congressional vote the bill to bail out the banks did not pass, however one of the CEOs cut a back room deal forcing tax payers to bail them out anyway.

You never hear about any of this on the main stream media because they are also bought and controlled.

We elected Obama President in 2008 and instead of the change he promised we’ve only continued to get the same. He has also receiving millions in donations from Wall Street, and whenever he attempts to fight back, he always backs down and gives in.

The people are getting tired of this, and one example are the protests on Wall Street, today over 50 people have been arrested for no reason whatsoever. Many brutally so. 

This is a big deal, this is supposed to be the United States of America. Things like this shouldn’t be happening in the first place but it is. We are moving backwards as a country and not forward.

For those feeling out of the loop.

I’ve been wanting to comment on this situation for a while, but I can’t without getting angry, so here, have somebody else talking about it.

Essentially, peaceful protests on Wall Street end with police brutality and the media conveniently has “better” things to report on than this.

I’m feeling incredibly powerless while reading about this. It frustrates me beyond comprehension until my brain shuts off.

(via formerlyroxy)

Over the next two centuries [after 1540], wars of outright extermination had been fought by British colonists against “the Indians of Virginia” and nations such as the Pequot (who were among those who had fed the Plymouth Colony on the first “Thanksgiving” in 1620). […]

By the mid-19th century, U.S. policymakers and military commanders were stating — openly, frequently, and in plain English — that their objective was no less than the “complete extermination” of any native people who resisted being dispossessed of their lands, subordinated to federal authority, and assimilated into the colonizing culture. The country was as good as its word on the matter, perpetrating literally hundreds of massacres of Indians by military and paramilitary formations at points all over the West. A bare sampling of some of the worst must include the 1854 massacre of perhaps 150 Lakotas at Blue River (Nebraska), the 1863 Bear River (Idaho) Massacre of some 500 Western Shoshones, the 1864 Sand Creek (Colorado) Massacre of as many as 250 Cheyennes and Arapahoes, the 1868 massacre of another 300 Cheyennes at the Washita River (Oklahoma), the 1875 massacre of about seventy-five Cheyennes along the Sappa Creek (Kansas), the 1878 massacre of still another 100 Cheyennes at Camp Robinson (Nebraska), and the 1890 massacre of more than 300 Lakotas at Wounded Knee (South Dakota). As the U.S. Bureau of the Census put it in 1894:

"It has been estimated that since 1775, more than [8,500 Indians] have been killed in individual affairs with [whites]… The Indian wars under the government of the United States have been more than 40 in number. They have cost the lives of… about 30,000 Indians… The actual number of killed and wounded Indians must be very much greater than the number given, as they conceal, where possible, their actual loss in battle… Fifty percent additional would be a safe number to add to the numbers given."

This comes to a minimum of 56,750 Indians killed outright by Euroamericans militarily pushing into native lands during a period roughly conforming to the century spanning the years 1775-1875. Thornton, who has examined the matter closely, suggests that the official number is far too low and might “easily” be doubled.

Demography of Native North America by Lenore A. Stiffarm

During 1763, while striving to defeat Pontiac’s confederation of Ottowas and other peoples:

Sir Jeffrey Amherst, commander-in-chief of the British forces, wrote in a postscript of a letter to Bouquet [a subordinate] that smallpox be sent among the disaffected tribes. Bouquet replied, also in a postscript, “I will try to [contaminate] them with some blankets that may fall into their hands, and take care not to get the disease myself” … To Bouquet’s postscript Amherst replied, “You will do well to [infect] the Indians by means to blankets as well as to try every other method that can serve to extirpate this exorable race.” On June 24, Captain Ecuyer, of the Royal Americans, noted in his journal: “…we gave them two blankets and a handkerchief out of the smallpox hospital. I hope it will have the desired effect.”

It did. The disease spread rapidly among the Mingo, Delaware, Shawnee, and other nations of the Ohio River Valley, killing perhaps 100,000 people and bringing about the collapse of Pontiac’s military alliance.

Demography of Native North America by Lenore A. Stiffarm, with the middle paragraph quoted from The Effects of Smallpox on the Destiny of the Amerindian by E. Wagner Stearn and Allen E. Stearn

extirpate = to root out and destroy completely

The issue goes to the concept of the “Norman Yoke,” an element of juridical philosophy arising among medieval Anglo-Saxons and subsequently incorporated into the British variants of the Doctrine of Discovery and Rights of Conquest. In simplest terms, the concept, as it was eventually articulated in John Locke’s philosophy of Natural Law, held that any “Christian” (read: European) happening upon “waste land” — most particularly land that was vacant or virtually vacant of human inhabitants — assumed not only a “natural right,” but indeed an obligation to put such land to “productive use.” Having thus performed “God’s will” by “cultivating” and thereby “conquering” the former “wilderness,” its “discoverer” can be said to “own” it. It was upon this peculiar doctrine that Chief Justice of the Supreme Court John Marshall, in his 1823 opinion in the Johnson v. McIntosh case, based the notion that the U.S. holds “inherent and preeminent rights” over Indian lands.

For Marshall’s utilization of the idea of the Norman Yoke to work out for the United States, it was/is necessary to believe that there were very few native people prior to the onset of the European invasion of North America. A substantial precontact native population would imply that the land was for all intents and purposes not vacant. […]

For Eurosupremecists, either historical or contemporary, to admit that the precontact Native North American population had been fifteen million rather than one or two million would compel their admission of a number of other uncomfortable facts. For instance, the larger population figure could only have been sustained by a primary reliance upon extensive agriculture rather than hunting and gathering. This, in turn, means that precontact American Indians were primarily “sedentary” rather than “nomadic,” cultivators of the land, and residents of permanent towns rather than wandering occupants of a “barren wilderness.”

Demography of Native North America by Lenore A. Stiffarm

Regarding the two numbers s/he throws out: They’re both estimates of the pre-European-contact native population of the continental United States.  1-2 million is an old estimate that was derived through pretty shoddy estimation methods and was biased by the wish to downplay the size of the native population and shore up the myth of “No really you guys, the continent was practically empty so it’s totes okay that we stole it!”  15 million is a more recent and much more accurate estimate.

Imagine you live in a nation where the government owns your property. It has a powerful agency called the Bureau of Caucasian Affairs to control wards of the state, including you. The agency supervises your family and decides what is best. It handles your money, enforces morals, personal appearance, and manner of dress. It provides state-approved religion, schooling, and food for your community. This is all done by the superintendent — a government bureaucrat placed in charge of your community with complete control over it. No one can leave without his permission. Like a god, he makes the laws and acts as the police, prosecutor, judge, and jury. The courts cannot review his actions, for they are all, by definition perfectly legal.

Sound like totalitarianism? Nope, it is the abuse of guardianship. For several generations, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) used its trustee powers to become an intolerant and all-powerful ruler of Indian people, and the courts allowed this anomaly to happen.

In the Courts of the Conqueror by Walter Echo-Hawk
American history was for a long time written and taught as a single story, a narrative of nation building and unending progress that united the diverse participants in the country’s past in a single American “experience.” It was a national success story, celebrating the human triumphs made possible in a society based on the principles of liberty and equality. American historians tended to ignore or dismiss people whose experiences and interpretations of the past did not conform to the master narrative. The experiences of American Indians during the years of nation building told a story of decline and suffering rather than of “progress” and “the pursuit of happiness.” As a result, notes historian Frederick E. Hoxie, the authors of United States history textbooks had “great difficulty shaping the Native American experience to fit the upbeat format of their books.” The Indians’ story was not the American story; best to leave them out.

First Peoples: A Documentary Survey of American Indian History by Colin G. Calloway

I had to laugh at the second-to-last sentence because wow, trying to make a centuries-long genocide seem “upbeat?”  Yeah, I imagine that’d be pretty difficult to pull off.  *headdesk*

Lololololol um, this is closer to the truth than I’d like to admit.

Lololololol um, this is closer to the truth than I’d like to admit.

So let me say this as clearly as I can — the United States is not and will never be at war with Islam.
– President Obama (via nowaitninjas)

(Source: hahahanooope, via mistyknights)

A friend of mine has an American boyfriend, who once said that he always had figured that the odds that his girlfriend wouldn’t have sex with him (or have huge hangups about it) would be around 50-50, and I never really understood why. I think I unconsciously imagine American culture as “just like ours except everyone speaks English” (I’m Swedish), probably because American media is everywhere here and thus kind of feels like “home” even though it’s not. I know the gender roles are a bit different but that didn’t seem to be the whole explanation. I thought there must be something else going on, but I couldn’t figure it out.

Then, I started reading http://www.fugitivus.net/ and Tiger Beatdown, and I learned just how hard it can be for Americans to get birth control, plan B or an abortion, even though they’re legal. Here, there are youth clinics that seem pretty similar to PP, except they are not controversial at all. You will probably visit one as part of sex ed around 8th grade. Abortions are free up to a certain age (18 or 20 or something) but even when they’re not, they won’t cost more than 300 SEK (around $45). Minors don’t have to notify their parents. Birth control is subsidized and you can get free condoms from the youth clinics. Some people dislike abortions, but they have no political influence, and absolutely no one thinks the plan B pill is immoral.

Several of my friends have needed plan B, some of them while minors, and they just went to the nearest youth clinic and asked for it. No charge, no hassle, no protestors, no conscience clauses, no having to travel hours and hours just to find a clinic. Just swallow the pill, withstand some friendly teasing and get on with your life.

I think this difference between American and Northern/Western European women’s lives is absolutely fundamental, and to me it completely explains why my friend’s American boyfriend expected that girls wouldn’t sleep with him – not because they wouldn’t want to or because American women are more sensitive to pressure from gender roles, but because they would be taking a huge personal risk. I totally get why a lot of people wouldn’t be up for that. (It also explains why some Americans want to use condoms and the pill at the same time – before understanding your lack of abortion access that seemed pretty paranoid to me, but now I get it!)

I try to imagine not having access to affordable birth control or abortions, and it’s a horror movie level of scary. Just imagining that someone could impregnate me against my will and not being able to do anything about it… holy shit.

– AK, a Swede, commenting on the reproductive rights situation in America, on the Tiger Beatdown post
"How I Stopped Hating Thanksgiving and Learned to Be Afraid"
"Considering that virtually none of the standard fare surrounding Thanksgiving contains an ounce of authenticity, historical accuracy, or cross-cultural perception, why is it so apparently ingrained? It is necessary to the American psyche to perpetually exploit and debase its victims in order to justify its history?"
"

Rand expresses, with a certain pithy crudeness, an instinct that courses through us all sometimes: I’m the only one who matters! I’m not going to care about any of you any more! She then absolutizes it in an amphetamine Benzedrine-charged reductio ad absurdum by insisting it is the only feeling worth entertaining, ever.

This urge exists everywhere, but why is it supercharged on the American right, where Rand is regarded as something more than a bad, bizarre joke? In a country where almost everyone believes—wrongly, on the whole—that they are self-made, perhaps it is easier to have contempt for people who didn’t make much of themselves. And Rand taps into something deeper still. The founding myth of America is that the nation was built out of nothing, using only reason and willpower. Rand applies this myth to the individual American: You made yourself. You need nobody and nothing except your reason to rise and dominate. You can be America, in one body, in one mind.

She said the United States should be a “democracy of superiors only,” with superiority defined by being rich. Well, we got it. As the health care crisis has shown, today, the rich have the real power: The vote that matters is expressed with a checkbook and a lobbyist. We get to vote only for the candidates they have pre-funded and receive the legislation they have preapproved. It’s useful—if daunting—to know that there is a substantial slice of the American public who believe this is not a problem to be put right, but morally admirable.

"
Many of you may not understand what’s going on with OccupyWallStreet…
"

Over the next two centuries [after 1540], wars of outright extermination had been fought by British colonists against “the Indians of Virginia” and nations such as the Pequot (who were among those who had fed the Plymouth Colony on the first “Thanksgiving” in 1620). […]

By the mid-19th century, U.S. policymakers and military commanders were stating — openly, frequently, and in plain English — that their objective was no less than the “complete extermination” of any native people who resisted being dispossessed of their lands, subordinated to federal authority, and assimilated into the colonizing culture. The country was as good as its word on the matter, perpetrating literally hundreds of massacres of Indians by military and paramilitary formations at points all over the West. A bare sampling of some of the worst must include the 1854 massacre of perhaps 150 Lakotas at Blue River (Nebraska), the 1863 Bear River (Idaho) Massacre of some 500 Western Shoshones, the 1864 Sand Creek (Colorado) Massacre of as many as 250 Cheyennes and Arapahoes, the 1868 massacre of another 300 Cheyennes at the Washita River (Oklahoma), the 1875 massacre of about seventy-five Cheyennes along the Sappa Creek (Kansas), the 1878 massacre of still another 100 Cheyennes at Camp Robinson (Nebraska), and the 1890 massacre of more than 300 Lakotas at Wounded Knee (South Dakota). As the U.S. Bureau of the Census put it in 1894:

"It has been estimated that since 1775, more than [8,500 Indians] have been killed in individual affairs with [whites]… The Indian wars under the government of the United States have been more than 40 in number. They have cost the lives of… about 30,000 Indians… The actual number of killed and wounded Indians must be very much greater than the number given, as they conceal, where possible, their actual loss in battle… Fifty percent additional would be a safe number to add to the numbers given."

This comes to a minimum of 56,750 Indians killed outright by Euroamericans militarily pushing into native lands during a period roughly conforming to the century spanning the years 1775-1875. Thornton, who has examined the matter closely, suggests that the official number is far too low and might “easily” be doubled.

"
"

During 1763, while striving to defeat Pontiac’s confederation of Ottowas and other peoples:

Sir Jeffrey Amherst, commander-in-chief of the British forces, wrote in a postscript of a letter to Bouquet [a subordinate] that smallpox be sent among the disaffected tribes. Bouquet replied, also in a postscript, “I will try to [contaminate] them with some blankets that may fall into their hands, and take care not to get the disease myself” … To Bouquet’s postscript Amherst replied, “You will do well to [infect] the Indians by means to blankets as well as to try every other method that can serve to extirpate this exorable race.” On June 24, Captain Ecuyer, of the Royal Americans, noted in his journal: “…we gave them two blankets and a handkerchief out of the smallpox hospital. I hope it will have the desired effect.”

It did. The disease spread rapidly among the Mingo, Delaware, Shawnee, and other nations of the Ohio River Valley, killing perhaps 100,000 people and bringing about the collapse of Pontiac’s military alliance.

"
"

The issue goes to the concept of the “Norman Yoke,” an element of juridical philosophy arising among medieval Anglo-Saxons and subsequently incorporated into the British variants of the Doctrine of Discovery and Rights of Conquest. In simplest terms, the concept, as it was eventually articulated in John Locke’s philosophy of Natural Law, held that any “Christian” (read: European) happening upon “waste land” — most particularly land that was vacant or virtually vacant of human inhabitants — assumed not only a “natural right,” but indeed an obligation to put such land to “productive use.” Having thus performed “God’s will” by “cultivating” and thereby “conquering” the former “wilderness,” its “discoverer” can be said to “own” it. It was upon this peculiar doctrine that Chief Justice of the Supreme Court John Marshall, in his 1823 opinion in the Johnson v. McIntosh case, based the notion that the U.S. holds “inherent and preeminent rights” over Indian lands.

For Marshall’s utilization of the idea of the Norman Yoke to work out for the United States, it was/is necessary to believe that there were very few native people prior to the onset of the European invasion of North America. A substantial precontact native population would imply that the land was for all intents and purposes not vacant. […]

For Eurosupremecists, either historical or contemporary, to admit that the precontact Native North American population had been fifteen million rather than one or two million would compel their admission of a number of other uncomfortable facts. For instance, the larger population figure could only have been sustained by a primary reliance upon extensive agriculture rather than hunting and gathering. This, in turn, means that precontact American Indians were primarily “sedentary” rather than “nomadic,” cultivators of the land, and residents of permanent towns rather than wandering occupants of a “barren wilderness.”

"
"

Imagine you live in a nation where the government owns your property. It has a powerful agency called the Bureau of Caucasian Affairs to control wards of the state, including you. The agency supervises your family and decides what is best. It handles your money, enforces morals, personal appearance, and manner of dress. It provides state-approved religion, schooling, and food for your community. This is all done by the superintendent — a government bureaucrat placed in charge of your community with complete control over it. No one can leave without his permission. Like a god, he makes the laws and acts as the police, prosecutor, judge, and jury. The courts cannot review his actions, for they are all, by definition perfectly legal.

Sound like totalitarianism? Nope, it is the abuse of guardianship. For several generations, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) used its trustee powers to become an intolerant and all-powerful ruler of Indian people, and the courts allowed this anomaly to happen.

"
"American history was for a long time written and taught as a single story, a narrative of nation building and unending progress that united the diverse participants in the country’s past in a single American “experience.” It was a national success story, celebrating the human triumphs made possible in a society based on the principles of liberty and equality. American historians tended to ignore or dismiss people whose experiences and interpretations of the past did not conform to the master narrative. The experiences of American Indians during the years of nation building told a story of decline and suffering rather than of “progress” and “the pursuit of happiness.” As a result, notes historian Frederick E. Hoxie, the authors of United States history textbooks had “great difficulty shaping the Native American experience to fit the upbeat format of their books.” The Indians’ story was not the American story; best to leave them out."
"So let me say this as clearly as I can — the United States is not and will never be at war with Islam."
"

A friend of mine has an American boyfriend, who once said that he always had figured that the odds that his girlfriend wouldn’t have sex with him (or have huge hangups about it) would be around 50-50, and I never really understood why. I think I unconsciously imagine American culture as “just like ours except everyone speaks English” (I’m Swedish), probably because American media is everywhere here and thus kind of feels like “home” even though it’s not. I know the gender roles are a bit different but that didn’t seem to be the whole explanation. I thought there must be something else going on, but I couldn’t figure it out.

Then, I started reading http://www.fugitivus.net/ and Tiger Beatdown, and I learned just how hard it can be for Americans to get birth control, plan B or an abortion, even though they’re legal. Here, there are youth clinics that seem pretty similar to PP, except they are not controversial at all. You will probably visit one as part of sex ed around 8th grade. Abortions are free up to a certain age (18 or 20 or something) but even when they’re not, they won’t cost more than 300 SEK (around $45). Minors don’t have to notify their parents. Birth control is subsidized and you can get free condoms from the youth clinics. Some people dislike abortions, but they have no political influence, and absolutely no one thinks the plan B pill is immoral.

Several of my friends have needed plan B, some of them while minors, and they just went to the nearest youth clinic and asked for it. No charge, no hassle, no protestors, no conscience clauses, no having to travel hours and hours just to find a clinic. Just swallow the pill, withstand some friendly teasing and get on with your life.

I think this difference between American and Northern/Western European women’s lives is absolutely fundamental, and to me it completely explains why my friend’s American boyfriend expected that girls wouldn’t sleep with him – not because they wouldn’t want to or because American women are more sensitive to pressure from gender roles, but because they would be taking a huge personal risk. I totally get why a lot of people wouldn’t be up for that. (It also explains why some Americans want to use condoms and the pill at the same time – before understanding your lack of abortion access that seemed pretty paranoid to me, but now I get it!)

I try to imagine not having access to affordable birth control or abortions, and it’s a horror movie level of scary. Just imagining that someone could impregnate me against my will and not being able to do anything about it… holy shit.

"

About:

Female, bi, cis, white, USAmerican, recent college grad, animu/mango fangirl. Posts an odd mixture of social justice srs bizness, incoherent fandom squee, and Zero Punctuation screencaps. See also: the_sun_is_up@LJ.

Also runs @fuckyeahfemslash and @magicalgirlproject. *self-pimp self-pimp*

Fanart credits: If an artist's name is all numbers (e.g. 186384) then that artist is on Pixiv. If an artist's name is letters and/or numbers (e.g. Gabzillaz, Nami86) then that artist is on DeviantArt.

Some of my less intuitive tags:
girls who top = femdom
lesbians! = femslash, yuri, etc
homo homo ghei ghei = slash, yaoi, boysex, etc
bizarre love triangle = OT3, threesomes, etc
PRAISE GAGA = Lady Gaga
BeaBato = Beatrice/Battler
Twilol = funny Twilight things